Is Dating During Recovery a Good Idea?

Dating in general is tough and time consuming. From the butterflies to the impromptu date nights to the first real fight, dating can be quite the distraction from your everyday responsibilities and ultimately from your recovery. Getting back on the dating train too soon can be bad for business in early recovery. The feel-good hormones that are synonymous with those lovely first few months of hanging out with someone special are awesome — but can replace your drug of choice to become your new fix. Which is toxic for you and your new potential love. This may sound harsh but, think about your addiction as a disease or sickness — which is exactly what it is. You want to get better. Because being sick sucks.

Signs You’re Dating a Drug Addict

Dating and alcohol go hand-in-hand for many people who are on the lookout for a partner. But what is dating like for singles who are in recovery for alcohol use disorder? Here are the facts. I am an alcoholic; the kind who required chemical detoxes and rehab.

Usually addiction recovery professionals recommend steering clear of new relationships until you have been sober for about a year—of course.

First dates are awkward at best and downright disasters at worst. Perhaps the difficulty of dating is why there are currently more single people than ever before. However, sometimes the difficulties of dating can be a good thing. But, what if one day this really special person suddenly drops a bomb on you. After all, no one is perfect. While this may seem like a trivial detail, knowing what stage of recovery they are at can actually make a huge difference.

Generally speaking, recovering addicts are advised to take a break from dating during their first year of recovery. The starting point is the day they first became sober. The first year of recovery is extremely crucial for addicts. They also learn what triggers they need to avoid to stay on the road to sobriety. Adding dating to all of this can be super complicated, and not to mention, overwhelming.

Tips for Dating Someone in Recovery

At first glance, the person across the table looks amazing, has a great personality, and offers several qualities that you find attractive in a partner. But then, a discussion of addiction comes up, and from there, a little bit of anxiety may set in. Dating a recovering addict isn’t out of the question, but it helps to go into the situation well aware of the special circumstances that are going to surround the relationship. A recovering addict tends to avoid certain things.

Dating while in alcohol or drug addiction recovery is dangerous territory, and while many advise against it, how much truth is there in this.

Pull them into your peace. I was finally in a solid place when I met my now-ex-boyfriend earlier this year. I had created some healthy habits for myself and was fully recovered from the eating disorder that had ruled my life for eight years prior. Things had turned around completely for me, as now I was getting my first novel published and had a flourishing greeting card line.

I was completely infatuated with this talented individual from Seattle who made beautiful paintings and music. The art he made truly resonated with my soul, and he could say the same thing about my writing. Needless to say, it felt like a match made in heaven. So after our courtship, I was more than willing to move up to Seattle from Los Angeles and live with him.

I was heartbroken when four months into living together, he revealed he was addicted to meth. I was blindsided, stunned, and overwhelmed with a twister of emotions. How could I have not known? I scolded myself. When Alex admitted this to me, I cried in fear, certain that our lives would change for the worst. I knew this betrayal of trust would be difficult for me to recover from, as I became vigilant at his capacity for dishonesty.

How to Date a Recovering Heroin Addict

Recovery is a process, a long one in many cases. It can be tempting to jump into a new relationship during this time of discovery, but is dating during recovery a good idea? Recovery can mean different things, but generally, it involves more than just abstaining from drugs and alcohol. Yes, part of the recovery process will involve detoxing from those substances, but long-term change requires more than simply not using.

Can you handle dating an addict? We’re not going to lie, recovering addicts do tend to carry more baggage with them than the average person.

Focus on getting to know each other as people before rushing into a physically intimate relationship. It takes time for the brain and body to adjust to living a sober life. You can be a source of love, encouragement, and support, but the decision to remain in recovery belongs to your partner alone. If your attraction is based on a desire to rescue someone in need, you may be suffering from codependency.

This condition is characterized by an excessive emotional, physical, and psychological reliance on another person to boost your own self-esteem. Codependent relationships are not healthy for either partner. People in recovery often have a number of challenging issues in their past. To be a supportive partner, you need to have a solid understanding of substance abuse and recovery.

Visit sites such as DrugAbuse. You can also find a wealth of information resources at your local public library. Additionally, attending a support group for the friends and family of those in recovery may be beneficial. These groups let you learn more about addiction and recovery while providing a sympathetic ear when you face challenges in your relationship. People in recovery typically have a lot of meetings and appointments to attend. Time spent with addiction counselors and support groups is an investment in a better future for both of you.

7 Strategies for Balancing Early Recovery with a Serious Relationship

Dating in addiction recovery can present some extra challenges. This gives you an opportunity to focus on your recovery and become independent before attempting to start a new relationship. When you do start dating again, many people prefer to date people who are also in recovery. Many people have legitimate concerns about telling people about their substance use history.

(This, of course, is particularly dangerous for those who are in recovery from love/​relationship, sex and/or porn addictions.) Limerence, which is the rush you get.

We recommend that newly sober men and women avoid major life changes within their first year of recovery — and this includes getting into romantic relationships. Not only do relationships serve as distractions, but they can prove to be relapse triggers if they end. Many sober men and women choose to date people that are also in recovery. In some ways, this is beneficial. These include:. In some circumstances, dating someone who is also in recovery might prove to be a challenge.

Dating Someone in Addiction Recovery

Learning to feel emotions again, including positive feelings of love and intimacy, can be one of the most challenging parts of recovery, but also one of the most rewarding. Most recovering addicts have a long history of dysfunctional and destructive relationships. Early in recovery, relationships are one of the leading causes of relapse. People in recovery might choose to date a very different type of person when they first quit using as compared to when they have achieved a year of sobriety, observes Desloover.

SAMHSA’s National Helpline is a free, confidential, 24/7, day-a-year treatment referral and information service (in English and Spanish) for.

Depending on your background and how much you understand about the disease of addiction, reactions will vary. How can the person you know now be the same person who abused drugs or alcohol? For others, it may be a little easier to accept, especially in cases where one has dealt either first or second hand with a substance use disorder. Recovery is a long process. While everyone has their own unique timeline, it is most risky to get involved with a person in their first year of recovery.

The first year should be dedicated to a lot of self-work and self-care, as well as learning how to create healthy routines. The more you are able to understand their addiction and triggers, the more you will be able to understand their emotional undercurrent. Rather, you should ask questions that show you want to gain a deeper understanding of them. In many cases, people who have suffered from a substance abuse disorder hold their recovery and sobriety close to their hearts.

If you are going to move forward with the relationship, then you have to be willing to accept the baggage that comes with it. They could have legal, family, health, or financial issues. Be honest with yourself. Are you willing to accept the person for all their faults or not?

8 Tips for Dating Someone in Recovery

The warning signs of drug addiction can be difficult to identify. Being in a close relationship with someone who may be suffering from substance abuse or battling with addiction can be a challenging and confusing ordeal. Addiction is a progressive disease and can be difficult to identify at first. The o nset of drug use can begin with innocent, recreational use and evolve into something more complicated and problematic.

A lot can change due to drug and alcohol addiction, and successful rehabilitation entails rebuilding a person’s life. When it comes to relationships, the realities.

When they finally manage to get past all of the chemical baggage that they had been carrying with them for so long, what you will find in most instances is that former addicts have just as many outstanding qualities as anyone else, and this can make them a joy to be around for family and friends alike. But what about romance, dating, and even marriage? Is it wise to form a more intimate connection with an ex-addict or alcoholic, no matter how dramatically they appear to have turned their lives around?

In looking at the experiences of others, what we can say is that many who have formed romantic partnerships with former substance abusers have come to regret that decision immensely, while others have been able to establish satisfying permanent relationships with those who have successfully put their past addictions behind them. So there really is no hard and fast rule here — but there are some things you should think about before getting more deeply involved with someone in recovery.

And if you do decide to date someone with a history of drug or alcohol use, there are a number of signs you must watch out for in order to make sure your new partner is living up to his or her promises of sobriety. Recovering substance abusers often possess excellent attributes that are forged by the intensity of their personal experiences. They are often very compassionate and non-judgmental in their relations with others, will not shy away from confronting difficult problems head on, and will usually be right there to help those they love through their own darkest hours.

Successful recovering addicts and alcoholics will have learned much about the importance of honesty and open communication during their rehabilitation process, and this can carry over into their relationships with those to whom they become close. But when addicts and alcoholics suddenly begin closing down and become reticent to share what they are thinking and feeling, or to talk about what is happening in their lives, this is most likely a sign that something is wrong.

All recovering addicts have certain triggers that could lead to relapse. Before becoming involved with them, it is important to sit down and have a good long talk about what those triggers might be, based on their past experiences and on the insights they have gained during their counseling sessions and during their time in AA or NA. With good communication about this topic, the partner of someone in recovery can do a lot to keep the process on track — while protecting themselves at the same time.

While recovering addicts or alcoholics can make excellent companions, there is one principle that should be followed without exception — do not become involved with someone in recovery from substance abuse unless they have been clean and sober for at least one year.

Dating while in recovery


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